Muslim Burial Ground Peace Garden, Woking

A memorial garden, designed by terra firma, dedicated to the allied muslim soldiers that gave their lives during WWI – Royal opening in 2015.

Client Horsell Common Preservation SocietyYear2015LocationHorsell Common, WokingAwardsLGN Street Design Awards 2019 - Urban Greenspace

Muslim Burial Ground, Landscape Architecture, Heritage & Gardens, Woking
Muslim Burial Ground, Landscape Architecture, Heritage & Gardens, Woking
Muslim Burial Ground, Landscape Architecture, Heritage & Gardens, Woking

Memorial garden designed by terra firma within recently restored walls of a monument to First World War Muslim soldiers from the Commonwealth who died in the UK from their injuries. The garden was the recipient of a much publicised royal opening in November 2015.

Muslim Burial Ground, Landscape Architecture, Heritage & Gardens, Woking

Location

The site has a fascinating history and, together with the nearby Shah Jahan Mosque, is the oldest in the country. Built in 1889 by an extraordinary Jew, Dr Gottleib Wilhelm Leitner, the site sets a shining example of bringing together different faiths and cultures within the country.

The Burial Ground was founded in 1917 as a last resting place for Allied Muslim soldiers who died of their wounds in this country during WW1, and later supplemented with further burials in WW2, bringing the total numbers of graves to 27.

The terra firma Consultancy became involved as designers for the garden within the site, with a loose brief to conceive a special place of remembrance celebrating the vast, and vitally important, contribution made to the Allied war effort by armies of the Indian sub-continent.

In doing so, this could be a timely reminder of togetherness in today’s mixed culture in Britain.

“The Horsell Common Preservation Society, owners of the Muslim Burial Ground, are delighted with the tranquil Memorial Peace Garden that The terra firma Consultancy has designed and implemented.

“The Peace Garden is being used for formal events, as a teaching tool about the Muslim contribution to Britain for local schools, and is visited by local people to enjoy the space. The Society is so pleased that the Peace Garden has given new meaning, use, and beauty to the space surround by the restored walls of the decommissioned Muslim cemetery.”

Elizabeth Cuttle – Trustee of the Horsell Common Preservation Society